mush

(moosh)
n
British
1.
the face. A word which has been in use since the 19th century, when it often referred specifically to the mouth. Mush is nearly always used in connection with fisticuffs and may have originated as pugilists' slang. The precise etymology of the word is uncertain, but it has obvious connotations of softness and mastication.
2a.
an all-purpose term of address to a stranger (invariably used by men to other men). A working-class, mainly London, usage which was common in the 1950s and 1960s but is now rarely used. The word is not particularly friendly and is quite often used provocatively. It comes from the Romany word for man, moosh. 'I suggest you buy better shirts in future. Are you asking for a punch up the fag-hole, mush?'
(Hancock's Half Hour, BBC TV comedy, 6 November 1959)
2b.
a man, unnamed person. The deriva-tion for this usage is as for the previous sense. The word has rarely been used thus (rather than as a term of address) since the 1950s.

Contemporary slang . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mush — mush·a·roon; mush·er; mush·et; mush·i·ly; mush·i·ness; mush·mel·on; mush·rat; mush·roomy; mush; mush·room; mush·er·oon; …   English syllables

  • Mush — may refer to: mush (cornmeal) (/ˈmʌʃ/ or …   Wikipedia

  • Mush — • An Armenian Catholic see, comprising the sanjaks of Mush and Seert, in the vilayet of Bitlis Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Mush     Mush      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • mush — mush1 [mush] n. [prob. var. of MASH] 1. a thick porridge made by boiling meal, esp. cornmeal, in water or milk 2. any thick, soft, yielding mass 3. Informal maudlin sentimentality vt. [Dial., Chiefly Brit.] to make into mush; crush mush2 [mush] …   English World dictionary

  • Mush — Mush, n. [Perh. short for mush on, a corrupt of E. marchons, the cry of the voyageurs and coureurs de bois to their dogs.] A march on foot, esp. across the snow with dogs; as, he had a long mush before him; also used attributively. [Colloq.,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mush|y — «MUHSH ee», adjective, mush|i|er, mush|i|est. 1. like mush; pulpy: »Buck s feet sank into a white mushy something very like mud (Jack London) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Mush — Mush, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Mushed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mushing}.] To travel on foot, esp. across the snow with dogs. v. t. To cause to travel or journey. [Rare] [Colloq., Alaska & Northwestern U. S.] [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mush — Mush, n. [Cf. Gael. mus, muss, pap, porridge, any thick preparation of fruit, OHG. muos; akin to AS. & OS. m[=o]s food, and prob, to E. meat. See {Meat}.] Meal (esp. Indian meal) boiled in water; hasty pudding; supawn. [U.S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mush — Mush, v. t. [Cf. F. moucheter to cut with small cuts.] To notch, cut, or indent, as cloth, with a stamp. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mush — con hígado de pollo. El mush (a veces coosh) es un pudin espeso (o gachas) de maicena normalmente hecho con agua o leche. A menudo se fríe tras cortarse en cuadrado o rectángulos planos. Se usa comúnmente en el este y sur de los Estados Unidos.… …   Wikipedia Español

  • mush — ► NOUN 1) a soft, wet, pulpy mass. 2) cloying sentimentality. ► VERB ▪ reduce to mush. ORIGIN apparently a variant of MASH(Cf. ↑mash) …   English terms dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.